Archive for January 28th, 2006

Calling The First Disciples

Saturday, January 28th, 2006

Now as Jesus was walking by the Sea of Galilee, He saw two brothers, Simon who was called Peter, and Andrew his brother, casting a net into the sea; for they were fishermen.
And He said to them, “Follow Me, and I will make you fishers of men.”
Immediately they left their nets and followed Him.

Matthew 4:18-20 (New American Standard Bible)

Hamas Says It Will Not Change

Saturday, January 28th, 2006

And this surprises us somehow?? Here’s what I say…The pali’s selected hamas to be their leaders, they deserve what they get. I hope they get it too.

GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip – Following their resounding election victory, the Islamic militants of Hamas met the question of whether they will change their stripes with a loud “no”: no recognition of Israel, no negotiations, no renunciation of terror.
But the world holds out hope that international pressure can make them more moderate. At stake is the future of Mideast peacemaking, billions of dollars in aid and the Palestinians’ relationship with Israel, the United States and Europe.
Hamas’ victory — winning 76 of 132 parliament seats in Wednesday’s election — has created a dizzying power shift in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, overturning certitudes and highlighting the failure by Palestinian leaders, Israel and the international community to ease growing desperation in the Palestinian territories.
Weekend violence between Hamas and Palestinian policemen mostly allied with long-dominant
Fatah, and angry demonstrations by disgruntled gunmen fearing the loss of jobs and income after the Hamas win, have raised the specter of widespread civil strife.
After a brutal five-year campaign by Israel to destroy Hamas and assassinate its top leaders, the organization emerged stronger than ever and is poised to take over the Palestinian Authority.
The U.S. has pushed for democracy in the Middle East, hoping to promote moderation and head off more 9/11-style attacks, but, as in recent votes in Iraq, Egypt and Lebanon, a clean and fair election has empowered Islamists in the West Bank and Gaza.
Israel and the international community repeatedly have demanded that the Palestinian government disarm militias, but now that the main militia appears to have become the government, no one knows what will happen to its weapons.
The win by Hamas — which is responsible for dozens of suicide bombings on Israelis and has long called for the destruction of the Jewish state — caught everyone, including the organization itself, off guard.
Both Hamas and the international community face agonizing dilemmas. Hamas leaders say they won’t renounce their violent ideology, but the consequences of failing to do so are likely to be catastrophic: loss of life-sustaining aid, international isolation and a profound setback to their statehood aspirations.
The United States and many European countries say they’ll have nothing to do with a Hamas government, but a sharp cutoff in aid and an overly zealous stance could steer the Palestinians further away from moderation at an extremely delicate moment.

Read the rest here.

Hamas, Fatah gunmen battle over election results

Saturday, January 28th, 2006

This does my heart good. Now we have slimy pali terrorist shooting at other slimy pali terrorist. These people can’t get along with anyone.

GAZA (Reuters) – Hamas and Fatah gunmen exchanged fire on Friday amid political turmoil as the long-dominant Fatah faction was threatened with a violent backlash from within after its crushing election defeat by the Islamic militant group.
Hamas, whose shock parliamentary election victory changed the face of Palestinian politics and plunged Middle East peacemaking deeper in limbo, said it would hold talks soon with President Mahmoud Abbas on a “political partnership.” But Fatah leaders have rejected a coalition with Hamas.
The United States said it will review funding to the aid-dependent Palestinians if Hamas enters government and Israel suggested it could suspend customs revenue transfers, adding economic uncertainty to the political upheaval.
Some 20,000 Fatah supporters took to the streets in angry protests across the Gaza Strip, burning cars outside the Palestinian parliament building and firing rifles in the air. Some Hamas posters were ripped down by the crowd, which burned tires in the streets.
Acknowledging Hamas’s new standing as a political powerhouse, Abbas told reporters: “We are consulting and in contact with all the Palestinian groups and definitely, at the appropriate time, the biggest party will form the cabinet.”
The militant al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigades, part of Fatah, issued a statement threatening to “liquidate” the faction’s leaders if they changed their minds and joined a Hamas-led administration.
At separate rallies, thousands of Hamas backers celebrated their surprise victory.
While Fatah leaders have called for a peaceful transition of power, bad blood runs deep between the secular and Islamist rivals. Many Hamas gunmen still harbor resentment over crackdowns by Palestinian security forces amid peace overtures by Abbas to Israel, which has sought a clampdown on armed groups.
In the first armed clash between Hamas and Fatah militants since Wednesday’s vote, three people were wounded in a gun battle near the southern city of Khan Younis.
In later flare ups there, Hamas gunmen and Palestinian security forces exchanged fire in Khan Younis, wounding a Hamas gunmen and two security officers.
Security sources said a further two policemen were wounded when masked gunmen, wearing trademark green Hamas headbands, fired at a patrol car, underscoring the difficulties ahead.

Read the rest here.