Archive for September 30th, 2006

Surprise! Moral movies draw 7 times the fans

Saturday, September 30th, 2006

What?? You mean movie fans want to watch good movies with their kids instead of watching movies filled with smut? Go figure.

A new study is confirming that if you want to make money in the movie business, get out your Bible and read the values it teaches.
According to the report from Ted Baehr, publisher of MovieGuide, Hollywood movies with strong Christian worldviews make two to seven times as much money as those flicks with explicit sex and nudity.
The assessment looked at nearly 2,700 of the top movies at the box office from 1996 through 2005, and said while pundits and advertisers like to believe that sex and nudity sells, nothing could be further from the truth.
“For example, in 2005, movies with a very strong Christian worldview, such as ‘The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe,’ averaged nearly $65 million at the box office, but movies with extreme, explicit sex and nudity, such as ‘Sin City,’ and ‘Inside Deep Throat,’ only averaged $11.2 million or $11.7 million,” the report said.
Movies with less nudity but still strong sexual content, such as “Wedding Crashers,” and “The Ice Harvest,” fared better, but still averaged less than $22 million in 2005, said MovieGuide, which describes itself as a Christian “ministry dedicated to redeeming the values of the mass media according to biblical principles, by influencing entertainment industry executives and helping families make wise media choices.”
As the number of obscenities and profanities rose, the income dropped, it said.
The report said for one reporting period the highest average return for movies with very strong foul language, sex and nudity content was only $27.7 million, and the lowest average for a clean movie was $20.6 million.
The full range for the year in which “The Passion of the Christ” appeared was from $20.6 million to $106.3 million for movies with strong Christian worldviews. For the typically non-family-oriented flick the full range was from $6.3 million to $27.7 million.
“The vast majority of moviegoers, which includes the 141 million Americans who go to church every week, prefer positive Christian movies with morally uplifting content,” the report said.
“If Hollywood executives and filmmakers want to make more money at the box office, they should make more movies that reflect a very strong Christian worldview with very strong moral values,” the study said.
The assessment divided movies into four categories: very strong Christian and redemptive worldview, movies with extreme foul language, movies with strong graphic sexual immorality, and movies with strong explicit nudity.
In that order, 2005 movies averaged $65 million, $24 million, $11 million and $11 million at the box office. The Christian worldview was at $106 million in 2004, but the other three categories dropped to $23 million, $6 million and $6 million.
Results for the latter three categories remained reasonably static over the decade of observation, but the movies with strong moral content have continued to rise from the first year’s $32 million average, the report said.

Original Link.

Bible Verses In Veggie Tales Offensive to NBC, but Madonna on Cross Isn’t

Saturday, September 30th, 2006

Here is the text of an AFA action alert email I received.

Dear Steve,
NBC anti-Christian bigotry continues. This time NBC censored Bible verses and expressions of Christian love from the children’s cartoon Veggie Tales being shown Saturday mornings on NBC.
NBC says comments such as “God made you special and He loves you very much” were offensive and censored them from the show.
In response to the outrage over the allegations that NBC was ordering the removal of any references to God and the Bible from the animated series, the network first issued a flat denial. As reported in Broadcasting & Cable, NBC said they had to “clip off the beginning and ending tags, which are Bible verses, but they were also arguably the easiest cut to make.”
The creator of Veggie Tales, Phil Vischer, said NBC’s excuse for censoring the Bible verses was not true. Vischer said, “Well, that’s kinda funny, because as the guy required to do all the editing, I know that statement is false…The show wasn’t too long, it was too Christian. The show was already cut down to the proper length, so timing had nothing to do with it.”
NBC then backpeddled: “NBC is committed to the positive messages and universal values of Veggie Tales. Our goal is to reach as broad an audience as possible with these positive messages while being careful not to advocate any one religious point of view.” Evidently NBC considers not being truthful as one of their “universal values.”
Vischer said had he known how much censorship NBC would exercise, he would not have signed on for the network deal.
Censored were comments such as: “Calm down. The Bible says we should love our enemies.” And “the Bible says Samson got his strength from God. And God can give us strength, too.”
NBC says using Bible verses or referring to God is offensive to some non-Christians. But NBC doesn’t hesitate to offend Christians by showing Madonna mocking the crucifixion of Christ. Neither do not mind offending Christians in their new program Studio 60 with a segment called Crazy Christians. (Please read the review.)
This will seem a strong statement, and it is: The real reason the religious content is being censored is that the networks are run by people who have an anti-Christian bias. I noticed this anti-Christian bigotry and spoke out against it over 25 years ago. I’m sorry if someone thinks that is too harsh, but I must speak the truth as God leads me to see the truth. (Please click here to read excerpts from a speech I gave to a group of TV officials in September, 1981—25 years ago.)

Take Action
1. Send an email to NBC asking them to end their bias against Christians and stop censoring the references to God’s love in Veggie Tales.
2. Forward this to friends and family so they will know of NBC’s anti-Christian bias. NBC is owned by General Electric.
3. Print out the AFA Pass Along sheet and distribute at your Sunday School class and church. Ask your pastor to encourage members to send an email.

Link to AFA.