Archive for March 28th, 2008

Documentary Examines the Silencing of Darwin Skeptics in Schools

Friday, March 28th, 2008

Since most people have not studied nor have a basic understanding of statistics (if they did, lottery sales and the gambling industry would cease to exist almost overnight), I use this example to prove that life coming into existence spontaneously and by accident, is quite impossible. To date, no one has yet to offer any solid evidence to counter my example.
The odds of the necessary amino acids accidentally coming together in the correct sequence to form a “simple cell” are akin to blowing up a print shop and as the type rains down from the sky, it lands in the exact order to create the complete unabridged dictionary. In others words, it is virtually impossible. Now take the fact that we are not made up of simple cells, but of complex ones, and the fact that we are not single celled organisms, but made up of complex series of millions of cells. The odds of this happening by accident are so astronomical that it is completely impossible.
How did non-living matter become the “primordial soup” that evolutionist go on about? How did non-living become living? How did a non-living matter suddenly change into the necessary amino acids necessary and combine into the proper “recipe” to begin living?
Evolutionist, especially the atheist, get after us Christians and other religious people for “blind faith”, yet they are just as guilty of it as we are. At least we have eye witness accounts to prove our God lived. They don’t even have that.
We are asked to believe that we came from living “soup” that spontaneously and miraculously sprang into existence from nothing and then over the course of the last four and half million years (the age of the earth) “evolved” from living “soup” into what we are today. Completely ignored is the fact that with each evolutionary step taking tens of thousands of years, if not longer, the earth hasn’t been in existence long enough for us to arrive at the state we currently enjoy. Completely ignored is the statistical evidence I presented above. Completely ignored is the lack of evidence of the transitional species.
Evolutionist, go ahead and worship your god of Darwin and his half baked theory. But before you accuse Christians and other creation believers of adhering to non-scientific fantasy, you might want to look in mirror.

Opening April 18, Expelled: No Intelligence Allowed stars author, former presidential speechwriter, lawyer and actor Ben Stein. Throughout the documentary, Stein is followed by a camera crew while he questions noted scientists about the origins of life. The project also features many professors who lost their positions because they taught intelligent design alongside Darwin’s theory of evolution.

Mark Mathis is the associate producer of Expelled: No Intelligence Allowed, and he says the documentary is entertaining as well as informative. “We knew the public wouldn’t be interested in seeing a 90-minute science class. You have to entertain people,” he explains. “So Ben Stein is the perfect person to carry this film.”

Mathis says they were able to tell a “very troubling and disturbing” story with Stein’s comedic edge. He says the disturbing message of the film is that taxpayer money is being used to “jam” Darwinism, “an atheistic view of life,” down the throats of students. Another disturbing aspect the film points out is the silencing and potential firing of those professors who dare suggest an intelligent design to life.

Original Link.

Gore: Global Warming ‘Deniers’ are Flat Earthers

Friday, March 28th, 2008

Gore apparently believes that if he says something often enough that somehow it becomes true. He also has no logical arguments or valid data to support his claim, so he is reduced to name calling. Maybe someone should send him some “carbon credits” to ease his pain.
Oh yeah, for those of you who have not heard of “carbon credits”, these little gems are the latest form of “global warming creative accounting”. Let’s say that we have a family who, because of having a small house and/or driving a small car, or something like that, doesn’t use all of the energy available to them. Someone like Gore, who owns multiple “huge” houses, multiple “large” vehicles, and fly in private jets, can then buy these “credits” to offset their own astronomical energy use.
It’s the usual condescending activist’s “little people, I am someone and you are not; do as I say, not as I do” mentality. It’s way to have two sets of standards, one for us and one for them. Typical liberal duplicitousness and double speak.

Despite mounting evidence contrary to his hysterical proclamations, former Vice President Al Gore, he of the massive carbon footprint and $30,000 utility bills, is still clinging to his discredited theory of global warming.

In an interview with Lesley Stahl to air on “60 Minutes” this Sunday, Gore piously declares those who don’t buy his climate change theories are akin to crackpots who believe the earth is flat and don’t believe man landed on the moon in 1969.

Apparently rather than debating the merits of his argument in a rational and reasoned manner, Gore is left only with ad hominem attacks and smug condescension toward his critics.

Original Link.

Rhode Island Governor Steps Up Illegal Immigration Fight

Friday, March 28th, 2008

If the federal government isn’t going to enforce the law, I guess it’s up to the states to do it.

PROVIDENCE, Rhode Island — Linking the presence of undocumented workers to Rhode Island’s financial woes, Gov. Don Carcieri signed an executive order that includes a series of steps to combat illegal immigration.

The order signed Thursday requires state agencies and companies that do business with the state to verify the legal status of employees. It also directs the Rhode Island State Police and prison and parole officials to more aggressively find and deport illegal immigrants.

The Republican governor said he understands that illegal immigrants face hardships — but he does not want them in Rhode Island, America’s smallest state. “If you’re here illegally, you shouldn’t be here illegally. You shouldn’t be here,” Carcieri said.

Immigrant advocate Juan Garcia feared Carcieri’s proposals would drive a vulnerable community underground. He said illegal immigrants who are victims of crime will fear approaching police, and that children could suffer if parents lose their jobs.

“These people are not criminals,” he said. “This is affecting the poor people.”

Carcieri’s popularity has plummeted in recent months as Rhode Island faces an estimated $550 million (euro348.41 million) budget deficit, its worst financial crisis since a series of bank and credit union collapses in the early 1990s. He has proposed cutting school funding, reducing welfare and health care benefits and even letting prisoners out of jail early.

He blamed Congress for failing to set a new immigration policy. He said he supported increasing the number of legal immigrants and skilled workers allowed into the country.

Carcieri was testy when taking questions after signing the order. When a reporter asked if his order might embolden xenophobes, Carcieri blamed the media for inflaming the immigration debate.

Under his order, state police will enter an agreement with federal immigration authorities permitting them access to specialized immigration databases. That information would allow police to identify and detain immigration violators.

State police could investigate the legal status of anyone they suspect is an immigration violator, including crime victims, witnesses and people supplying police with confidential tips, state police Maj. Steven O’Donnell said.

Department of Corrections Director A.T. Wall said the prison system will negotiate a similar agreement so it too can identify illegal immigrants in state custody as well as legal immigrants who are subject to deportation if convicted of crimes.

Carcieri said he supported legislation that would force all companies in Rhode Island to do the same. He said he did not know how much his initiatives would cost, although he assumed they would save money in the long run.

Original Link.

“Atheism Versus the Resurrection” Dr. Mark W. Hendrickson

Friday, March 28th, 2008

In recent years, it has become fashionable among secular journals to mark Easter week by publishing articles denying that Jesus Christ was resurrected from the tomb. It seems they can always find someone with the credentials of a Christian minister to assert that the resurrection was metaphorical, not literal.

I almost got through last week without encountering such an article. Almost. Late in the week, while surfing financial and political sites on the web, I saw a link to an article titled, “Jesus, Entombed in Heaven,” by Rev. William Alberts, Ph.D., a Methodist and Unitarian Universalist minister. Intrigued by the title, I clicked on the link. My “reward” was this unequivocal repudiation of Scripture: “Contrary to the New Testament record, no resurrected Jesus appeared to his disciples shortly after his crucifixion.” Clearly, the gospel according to Rev. Dr. Alberts is the not same as the gospel according to Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John.

On the positive side, perhaps we Americans—Christian and non-Christian—should be grateful to live in a country where people don’t have to fear for their lives for questioning the accuracy of Holy Scripture. For Christians around the world, however, the phenomenon of a clergyman publicly denying the foundational event of Christianity—the resurrection of Jesus—demonstrates how deeply disbelief has penetrated contemporary Christendom.

The essence of such disbelief is the atheism of matter: The resurrection isn’t physically possible, the logic goes, so therefore it couldn’t have happened. Thus, by this reasoning, the laws of matter are supreme and the existence of God, Spirit (John 4:24), is dubious, if not impossible. According to the laws of physics, chemistry, and biology, a human body can’t walk on water, a woman can’t conceive without a sperm cell, a person can’t change water into wine or instantaneously heal all manner of diseases and deformities, and no one can be raised from the dead through prayer. Yet all these events are recorded in the Bible. (In fact, the prayers of Elijah, Elisha, Peter, and Paul, as well as those of Jesus, raised the dead, and such occurrences continued for several generations after Jesus, according to records left by the Jewish historian Josephus.) Either these extraordinary events happened and atheism is an error, or they didn’t happen and the Bible is just a collection of stories comparable to Aesop’s fables or Virgil’s “Aeneid.”

The linchpin of all Christian doctrine is the resurrection. As Paul plainly wrote to the Corinthians, “if Christ be not risen, then is our preaching vain, and your faith also is vain.” (I Cor. 15:14) So, the atheistic/Christian divide boils down to whether Jesus truly was resurrected from the grave.

The atheists have the unenviable challenge of trying to prove a negative—that the resurrection didn’t happen. At the same time, I don’t know how to prove to them that it did happen. Those who claim that the apostles fabricated Jesus’ resurrection and ascension have a logically weak case. Jesus’ apostles were persecuted and one by one executed, and yet they persisted to preach the risen Savior, willingly sacrificing their human lives in His service. How can anyone really believe that they were willing to suffer all this just to perpetuate a hoax?

This argument, however, is merely inferential. Ultimately, the question of the literal truth of the resurrection has to be resolved in one’s own conscience, as has happened to millions of people over the centuries. Here is how it transpired with me: I became an agnostic at age 12—a skeptic who insisted that if I were to believe in God, I required proof. That proof came the month I turned 22, when the prayers of a deeply committed Christian healed me instantaneously of a chronic medical condition that neither surgery nor drugs had been able to help. What ineffable grace, that I, a long-time skeptic, should receive the blessing of Christ’s healing touch.

Having experienced first-hand something that is “physically impossible,” I was impelled to the unshakable conclusion that God, Spirit, does indeed exist, and that His law is a higher law that trumps all material “laws,” and that physically impossible events, such as the Virgin Birth and bodily resurrection of Jesus, are entirely within the realm of God’s supreme capabilities.

I respect a person’s right not to believe in God if he or she hasn’t yet experienced God directly. I would gently encourage such individuals to try to be humble about their disbelief, though—and to refrain from asserting that, just because they haven’t experienced God, it is impossible that others have done so. I would also invite them to reach out for God if they should ever find themselves in a bad situation for which there is no material solution. To each of you individually, I say, you may not believe in God, but He believes in you.

Dr. Mark W. Hendrickson is a faculty member, economist, and contributing scholar with the Center for Vision & Values at Grove City College.

Original Link.

Pali Terrorist Rocket Hits Preschool

Friday, March 28th, 2008

The Pali Terrorist continue to try to kill innocent Israeli women and children. Why won’t the world put a stop to this?

Three Kassam rockets were fired at Israel from the northern Gaza Strip on Friday morning, one of them hitting the outer wall of a preschool in one of the kibbutzim in the Sha’ar Hanegev region moments after the children were taken inside by their teacher.

The teacher and a parent of one of the children suffered shock and the building was damaged.

Two other Kassam rockets that were fired at the western Negev landed in open areas and caused no wounded or damage.

Original Link.

‘Bias and Hypocrisy’ Displayed at UN Rights Council, Say Critics

Friday, March 28th, 2008

The U.N. Human Rights Council is a joke.

(CNSNews.com) – The United Nations’ Human Rights Council has elected onto a panel of special advisors a left-wing Swiss sociologist with a record of sympathizing with the Castro and Mugabe regimes and criticizing the United States and Israel.

And in another move that drew fire, the U.N.’s top rights body also appointed an American academic strongly critical of Israel to a post dealing with Israel’s conduct in the territories claimed by the Palestinians.

During its less than two years in existence, the Human Rights Council has itself been criticized — by Western governments and two U.N. secretary-generals among others — for focusing disproportionately on Israel, while paying relatively little attention to pressing rights issues elsewhere.

Meeting in Geneva on Wednesday, the council elected Swiss national Jean Ziegler as one of 18 members of an expert “advisory committee” that functions as the body’s think tank.

Forty of the council’s 47 members voted in favor of Ziegler, who for the past eight years has served as a U.N. “special rapporteur on the right to food.” (The U.N. has around 20 such reporter-investigators, each focused on a particular country situation or on a theme such as racism or extreme poverty.)

Advisory committee members serve three-year terms and are eligible for re-election once. According to U.N. documents, requirements for the posts include “recognized competence and experience in the field of human rights; high moral standing; and independence and impartiality.”

Among those who urged the Swiss government to rescind its nomination of Ziegler was U.S. Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen of Florida, ranking Republican on the House Foreign Affairs Committee.

In a letter sent earlier this week, Ros-Lehtinen accused Ziegler of “unyielding support of many of the world’s most vicious dictators,” and noted that a 2005 comment comparing Israelis to concentration camp guards had brought a reprimand from then U.N. secretary-general Kofi Annan.

Others who called on the Swiss government to withdraw the nomination included a group of non-governmental organizations (NGOs), Canadian lawmaker and human rights advocate professor Irwin Cotler, and former Cuban political prisoner Angel De Fana, who now heads a U.S.-based organization focusing on political prisoners in his homeland.

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