Archive for May 7th, 2008

The Big List: Female Teachers [Romantically Involved] with Students

Wednesday, May 7th, 2008

“[The] most comprehensive account on Internet of women predators on campus.” from WorldNetDaily.

Here is a list of the teacher ‘sexpidemic’ cases WND has documented where female teachers have been accused, or convicted, of assaulting students:

Rachael Burkhart, 25: Teacher at Lenoir City High School in Tennesee resigned in May 2008 amid allegations she had an inappropriate relationship with an 18-year-old male student. Burkhart stepped down after Lenoir City School Superintendent Wayne Miller confronted her. Miller said in a statement, “When an incident such as this happens, it undermines the foundation of what every teacher should stand for. It breaches the trust that teachers spend their entire career nurturing and offends everyone associated with education. It saddens me when one teacher has the ability to so negatively impact our community.”


Abbie Jane Swogger

Abbie Jane Swogger, 34: Teacher’s aide at Highlands Senior High School in Harrison, Pa., was arrested Feb. 22, 2008, for renting a hotel room where police found beer, marijuana, an open condom wrapper and at least four teenage girls and boys, including several of her 15-year-old son’s friends. Though categorically denying rumors she was having sex with students from the school, Swogger was quoted as saying, “I was stupid, very stupid. I already know I was and I can understand you looking at me wrong. It’s the biggest mistake I ever made in my whole life.” Police allege Swogger “asked or encouraged” two 15-year-old runaway girls to have sex with her. According to a police papers, Swogger admitted to having sex with a 17-year-old boy and asked police, “How serious is that?” The one-time exotic dancer resigned Feb. 25, 2008.

Adrianne Hockett: Accused of having sex with a 16-year-old special-needs student in a Houston apartment she rented for the get-togethers. The boy has testified the pair would “have sex, drink beer and smoke weed.”


Alison Mosbeck

Alison Mosbeck, 33: History teacher at Dueitt Middle School in the Spring, Texas, school district was arrested Oct. 26, 2007, for allegedly having intercourse at least three times with one of her students, a 14-year-old boy. The mother of one of the students’ friends saw text messages from Mosbeck on the student’s cellphone and alerted authorities.


Allenna Ward

Allenna Ward, 24: Minister’s daughter from Laurens County, S.C., was a second-year teacher at Bell Street Middle School in Clinton, S.C., when she was fired Feb. 28, 2007, for allegedly having sex with at least five boys. Some of the purported victims, ages 14 and 15, were students at Ward’s school. Authorities say the married woman had sex with the boys not only on campus, but also at a motel, in a park and behind a restaurant. On Sept. 6, 2007, Ward pleaded guilty to six charges – three second-degree criminal sexual conduct with a minor and three lewd acts on a minor. “Today, I publicly admit my guilt and would like to apologize. I sincerely apologize for the effects of my actions,” she told the court. On Feb. 19, 2008, she was sentenced to six years in prison.

Read the rest of the list here.

‘Day of Silence’ Walkout a Success

Wednesday, May 7th, 2008

The Day of Silence is promoted by the Gay, Lesbian, Straight Education Network (GLSEN) as an event to draw attention to alleged persecution suffered by students who claim to be homosexual or confused about their gender. But Pastor Ken Hutcherson of Antioch Bible Church in Redmond, Washington, claims the event was actually designed by homosexual activists to promote their lifestyle to students. So Hutcherson worked with other parents in the area of his daughter’s Mount Si High School to protest the event.

Hutcherson and his wife purchased a half-page ad in the local newspaper urging concerned parents and Christians to join them in protest of the event. “Then the word went out,” he explains. “It went out to my prayer warriors. And they prayed about it … and last Friday [April 25], we had probably about 250 to 300 parents there,” he contends.

But parents were not the only ones opposed to an entire school day being used to promote a lifestyle the Bible declares to be immoral, says Hutcherson. “There were 638 kids out of 1,410 kids that didn’t come to school that day,” he remarks.

Original Link.

Turning 60, Israelis Feel Pride, Palestinians “Pain”

Wednesday, May 7th, 2008

Another Pali sob story, this time brought to us by al-Reuters, who is always a worthy propaganda machine for the Pali terrorist.
This statement really sums up how the so-called Pali “right of return” should be treated.
“You can’t come back and say ‘my mother used to live here 50 years ago and it is mine now'”.

Let me parse the article a bit for you so you understand just how badly Reuters is spinning it to make the Israelis the demons and the Pali’s the so-called “innocent victim”.

“For Shamali, it is time to mourn the Nakba, or “catastrophe,” when 700,000 Palestinians, his own family among them, fled in fear of Jewish attacks as violence mounted”,
These attacks never occurred. The Pali’s fled out of fear based on lies fed to them by the surrounding Arab nations.

“As violence on both sides killed thousands in the months after a U.N. decision in 1947 to partition Palestine into Jewish and Arab states, the Shamali family and their neighbors crammed into a truck bound further down the Mediterranean coast to Gaza, outside the zone designated to Jewish control.
They slept on the beach while they hunted for lodgings.
After attending a United Nations school for refugees, Shamali built a business fixing cars and says he studiously avoided the politics and violence that shaped so many others.
But he resents Israelis for “stealing” his land and bristles at Feist’s suggestion he gave up the right to his Jaffa home.
‘How can the Israelis push us out of our land and homes and bring millions of people from Russia instead?’ he said, referring to Jewish immigration. ‘No one just leaves their house for no reason.'”

“Violence on both sides”? Here is more of Reuters selective memory concerning the war. Let me refresh everyone’s memory of how history actually happened.
The Arab countries, armed with a massive amount of World War Two weaponry left to them by the British and other allies, were poised on the borders of what was to become Israel. They had made their intent quite clear; if the U.N. followed through with it’s intention of declaring Israel a country, they would attack with every intent to destroy the fledgling country before it ever got started. And they tried to do exactly that. Once Israel came into existence, in a matter of hours, they attacked.
“Violence on both sides”? Yes, there was violence on both sides; the Arab side bent on the total annihilation of Israel, and the Israeli side, fighting for their very existence.
But let’s look at whole picture.
Although, according the article, 700,000 Arabs left the area out of “fear”, there were just as many who did not. They stayed in their homes.
Today, those people, or their ancestors, are Arab Israelis, with the same rights and privileges as any other Israeli citizen. And, if they so choose, are living on the same land they owned before the war. They were not attacked or killed by the Israeli. They didn’t believe the lies spun by the Arab nations. They were not killed, but became part of the new country of Israel.
“Stealing” the Arab’s lands? Not hardly. They left and never tried to come back until it was too late. Sure, they wanted to come back, but they waited for an Arab victory before attempting it; an Arab victory that never happened. They waited too long.
“You can’t come back and say ‘my mother used to live here 50 years ago and it is mine now’.” What a true statement.

REHOVOT, Israel/GAZA (Reuters) – Like the state of Israel, Akram al-Shamali and Moshe Feist both turn 60 this year. But that’s about where the similarities end.

For Feist, an Israeli, the anniversary is a chance to celebrate the Jewish state’s hard-fought achievements and swap stories of survival and patriotism over a glass of local wine.

For Shamali, it is time to mourn the Nakba, or “catastrophe,” when 700,000 Palestinians, his own family among them, fled in fear of Jewish attacks as violence mounted. He lives in the Gaza Strip, where Islamist rule makes alcohol taboo and an Israeli blockade cuts into any festivities.

Their opposing views on the conflict into which they were born reflect lives lived in close proximity — they grew up about 60 km (37 miles) from each other — but worlds apart.

Shamali slept in his mother’s arms in April 1948 as she fled the family home in Jaffa, a biblical city now a part of the Israeli city of Tel Aviv but for centuries a bustling Arab port. He has never since set foot in his parents’ house, but dreams of one day reclaiming it.

“I don’t know how or when, but one day I will go back to our house in Jaffa,” Shamali told Reuters in an interview at his dimly lit Gaza City office. “I feel it in my heart.”

The son of a German farm worker who fled Nazi Germany for a kibbutz in British-ruled Palestine, Feist was born a few months later than Shamali into the infant state of Israel, created as a haven for Jews after six million died in the Holocaust in Europe.

For Feist, Jaffa and other towns are now an inseparable part of his homeland and his view is that Palestinians gave up their rights there decades ago.

“You can’t come back and say ‘my mother used to live here 50 years ago and it is mine now’. So what?” Feist told Reuters at his airy apartment in Rehovot, near Tel Aviv. “The Arabs didn’t want to live with the Jews so they left. No one pushed them.”

REFUGEES

That’s not how Shamali sees it. When his parents and their four sons left Jaffa, they expected to return in months. He said they had hoped violence between Jews and Arabs would abate. It never happened.

As violence on both sides killed thousands in the months after a U.N. decision in 1947 to partition Palestine into Jewish and Arab states, the Shamali family and their neighbors crammed into a truck bound further down the Mediterranean coast to Gaza, outside the zone designated to Jewish control.

They slept on the beach while they hunted for lodgings.

After attending a United Nations school for refugees, Shamali built a business fixing cars and says he studiously avoided the politics and violence that shaped so many others.

But he resents Israelis for “stealing” his land and bristles at Feist’s suggestion he gave up the right to his Jaffa home.

“How can the Israelis push us out of our land and homes and bring millions of people from Russia instead?” he said, referring to Jewish immigration. “No one just leaves their house for no reason.”

Shamali’s garage is struggling because of an Israeli economic and military cordon meant to isolate Hamas, which seized the enclave in June. His workshop was empty this week due to fuel shortages that have forced most cars off the road.

The spirited businessman once shuttled back and forth to Tel Aviv to collect spare parts, but has not left Gaza — which is encircled by Israeli fences — since Israel tightened restrictions last June. “The worst thing is the lack of freedom,” he said.

TANKS

Feist also fixes vehicles — tanks.

He began his compulsory military service just before the 1967 Middle East war in which Israel captured and occupied the Gaza Strip and West Bank, and has fought in four conflicts. His three sons have all seen battle.

Feist now runs his own electrical business in Rehovot. He rarely comes into contact with Palestinians and has visited Gaza only four times in his life — three of those as a soldier, long before Israel pulled out its troops from the enclave in 2005.

Like many Israelis, Feist views the conflict with the Palestinians as important but remote — a serious problem but one that rarely disrupts his daily life, especially now suicide bombings have tailed off from a peak six years ago.

“Do you know how many people get hurt in traffic?” he joked, as he relaxed in shorts and a T-shirt in a living room bedecked with roses. “Terrorism is a big problem but Israeli drivers are a much bigger problem.”

Feist says he does not fret about much-discussed threats to the continued existence of the Jewish state and laughs if asked whether Israel will survive the next 60 years.

“For us as Jews, the best place to live is Israel — just like for the English, the best place to live is in England,” he said. “Why should Israel not exist in 60 years? You don’t talk about other countries just ceasing to exist?”

Original Link.

Georgia Very Close to War With Russia

Wednesday, May 7th, 2008

Matthew 24:1-8

Jesus left the temple and was walking away when his disciples came up to him to call his attention to its buildings. “Do you see all these things?” he asked. “I tell you the truth, not one stone here will be left on another; every one will be thrown down.”
As Jesus was sitting on the Mount of Olives, the disciples came to him privately. “Tell us,” they said, “when will this happen, and what will be the sign of your coming and of the end of the age?”

Jesus answered: “Watch out that no one deceives you. For many will come in my name, claiming, ‘I am the Christ, and will deceive many. You will hear of wars and rumors of wars, but see to it that you are not alarmed. Such things must happen, but the end is still to come. Nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom. There will be famines and earthquakes in various places. All these are the beginning of birth pains.

Russia’s deployment of extra troops in the breakaway Georgian region of Abkhazia has brought the prospect of war “very close”, a minister of ex-Soviet Georgia said on Tuesday.
Separately, in comments certain to fan rising tension between Moscow and Tbilisi, the “foreign minister” of the breakaway Black Sea region was quoted as saying it was ready to hand over military control to Russia.

“We literally have to avert war,” Temur Iakobashvili, a Georgian State Minister, told reporters in Brussels.

Asked how close to such a war the situation was, he replied: “Very close, because we know Russians very well.”

“We know what the signals are when you see propaganda waged against Georgia. We see Russian troops entering our territories on the basis of false information,” he said.

Georgia, a vital energy transit route in the Caucasus region, has angered Russia, its former Soviet master with which it shares a land border, by seeking NATO membership.

Original Link