Voter Anger Becomes Major Factor in US Elections

We can only hope that people have woken up to the destruction the Democrats and this administration have done to our country.

U.S. Senator John McCain survived a Republican primary challenge in Arizona on Tuesday. Senator McCain was the Republican Party’s presidential candidate in 2008, but may count himself lucky this year in an election climate that features voters angry with incumbent politicians from both parties.

2010 is shaping up as the year of the angry voter, and incumbent politicians from both parties are taking notice.

The latest example of voter anger is playing out in New York City over the controversial plan to build a mosque and Islamic center near the site of the 2001 terrorist attacks in lower Manhattan.

What is behind the anger?

The reasons for the anger vary, but much of it is related to the national economy. High unemployment, a weak housing market and growing pessimism about the future create the kind of frustration that leads to demands for political change in Washington.

Rusty is from Texas, and many things make him angry this year, especially the way President Barack Obama is running the country. He is a member of the Tea Party, which is not a political party, but a movement of grassroots conservatives unhappy with President Obama, the power of the federal government, government spending and the growing national debt.

Mike Harvey is a truck driver from Arizona. He is angry too and is counting on the Tea Party movement to help elect new members of Congress in the November elections.

“I hope they grow some legs and I hope they get something done before this place turns into Venezuela or Cuba,” he said. “They might have health care, but go ask them how they like it. And I think that if Obama gets his way, he is going to turn this place into Cuba and I do not want to see it.”

President Obama’s push for health-care and financial reform has also sparked a conservative backlash against the role of the central government in the everyday lives of Americans, says Quinnipiac University pollster Peter Brown.

“Only two percent of voters think that the government does the right thing almost all of the time. And only another 16 percent say government does the right thing most of the time. That is a pretty damning indictment of the government and its ability to do the right thing from the American people,” said Brown.

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