Cross-Like T-Shirt Design at Penn State University Sparks Controversy

It’s amazing the lengths anti-Christians will go to in order to find an issue to get upset about. Think of all the wonderful things that could be invented if only that energy was put to good use instead of being wasted on getting upset about nothing.

A blue, cross-like design emblazoned on T-shirts at Penn State University has some critics seeing red.

The shirts — intended to foster school spirit — sport a vertical blue line down the center with the words “Penn State White Out” emblazoned across the chest, forming a design that some say resembles a cross. The back of the shirt depicts the same blue line obscured by the words, “Don’t be intimated … It’s just me and 110,000 of my friends.” Roughly 30,000 of the shirts have been sold.

Penn State says it has received six complaints about the shirt, including one from the Anti-Defamation League’s Philadelphia branch, from people who say it connotes a Christian cross. The logo design also has become the focus of controversy in the student newspaper, “The Daily Collegian,” which has received several letters to the editor on both sides of the issue.

Michal Berns, a junior majoring in media law and policy, said she refused to buy the $15 shirt because of its religious connotations.

“At first glance, you don’t necessarily think that’s what it looks like, but when you look at it more, it does look like a cross,” Berns told Foxnews.com. “That’s the reason I didn’t purchase it.”

Berns said students can purchase the shirts when they buy season tickets for the university’s nationally ranked football program or during the football season at the campus bookstore and other stores. The shirts are typically worn at Penn State’s annual “White Out” game, at which a crowd of 100,000 screaming Nittany Lions fans creates a virtual sea of white at Beaver Stadium.

While Berns acknowledged the shirt’s single blue stripe resembles the stripe on the team’s football helmet, she and others at the university’s Hillel Jewish organization plan to show their school pride in other ways.

Bill Mahon, vice president for university relations, said six people have contacted Penn State to voice their objections to the shirt’s design.

“Six complaints is not a controversy,” Mahon wrote Foxnews.com. “Students submit shirt designs to the student paper each year. Students then vote for their favorite design and they are sold in the campus bookstore.”

Mahon said the design was based on the single blue stripe on the football team’s helmets and will not be pulled from store shelves as some have asked. “The shirts have sold out and no changes are planned,” he said.

Stephanie Bennis, a senior at the school, said she created the shirt’s design in March with fellow public relations major Emily Sabolsky, and in no way did they intend to create religious overtones. Like Mahon, she said the single blue stripe is a nod to the university’s football program.

“That was the entire idea,” she said. “And all we thought was normally wording goes right across the chest. That’s truly the reason why we did it.”

Bennis said she was “very shocked” when she learned the university had received complaints about the design.

“It’s just sad to see that in this day and age, the most offensive thing on a shirt can be what people see as a religious symbol,” she said.

“Are we going to ban lowercase t’s in the alphabet? Where do you draw the line?”

Nick Mangus, a senior majoring in East Asian studies, described the controversy as “ridiculous” and said images of crosses can be seen virtually anywhere, even in “tiles on the floor.”

“Honestly, I think it’s basically people just trying to stir up controversy over something that’s ridiculous,” Mangus said. “If you don’t want to buy it, don’t buy it. It’s that simple. You don’t have to try and force everyone else to change their ways because you think it’s offensive.”

Original Link.

2 Responses to “Cross-Like T-Shirt Design at Penn State University Sparks Controversy”

  1. Sue says:

    Sometimes I think, why do we (Christians) bother? Just let them have it their way…I know that is wrong, but I am getting so frustrated…

  2. Steve says:

    Hang in there, Sister. God is still in control. Nothing happens outside of His plans.

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